With a motive of good health, many patients take to particular diets to help with their illness. However, not all diets lead to optimal health. Some diets, if you are not aware of your condition and the effects of the food you’re consuming, can lead to results contrary to your initial motive – good health.

The paleolithic diet (paleo diet) is one many turn to in efforts to achieve good health. The paleo diet, a low-carb diet, has gained popularity in certain health crowds. The paleo diet consists of:

  • Vegetables: whole, frozen, fermented and pickled
  • Fruit: whole, frozen and rich in fats (coconut, avocado and olives)
  • Meat, fowl, fish, eggs and organ meats from natural sources
  • Dairy from pastured cattle
  • Nuts, seeds and their butters
  • Dark chocolate
  • Fats and oils: olive, coconut, butter and ghee
  • Herbs, spices, salt and pepper, vinegar, broth and salsa
  • Stevia and limited honey
  • Water, mineral water, tea, coffee and limited alcohol

Though a paleo diet has good aspects, like cutting out processed foods, refined sugars and refined carbohydrates, all individuals should be cautious about any diet that cuts out an entire group of foods (i.e., grains, beans, and legumes in this one).

“We know a plant-based diet that includes whole grains and plant-based proteins can help reduce cancer risk and is recommended for cancer survivors,” said Maria Petzel, a senior clinical dietitian at MD Anderson Cancer Center and a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board at the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN).

How may a paleo diet affect pancreatic cancer patients? Petzel believes not too positively.

“The lack of grains and plant proteins puts an individual at risk for vitamin and mineral deficiencies,” said Petzel. “A paleo diet may be intolerable to individuals with pancreatic cancer due to the high-fat content of the diet used to achieve adequate calorie intake.”

It’s advised to check with a medical professional to find out what diet best suits you.

Are you a pancreatic cancer patient or caregiver? You can access comprehensive disease information, including diet and nutrition tips, recipes and a booklet on the subject – all reviewed and approved by renowned leaders in the field, by contacting the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s one-on-one Patient Central by phone or email.

Come back to our blog each week for more Friday Fix: Low-Fat Diets May Lower Risk of Pancreatic Cancer.